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Flash Review 1, 3-26: An American on 42nd Street
At Home with David Dorfman

By Maura Nguyen Donohue
Copyright 2004 Maura Nguyen Donohue

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NEW YORK -- I've been thinking a lot about American-ness lately. Actually, I think about American-ness all the time but having been enmeshed in an international collaboration with a troupe from Vietnam for the past few weeks I've been thinking about it as related to contemporary dance. Last night, as part of the 10th Anniversary season of the 92nd St. Y Harkness Dance Project at the Duke on 42nd Street, David Dorfman Dance provided me with the example I want to cite the next time I have to describe American dance to an Asian peer. We are deep and humorous, adamantly informal and absolute mad dog dancers.

Before the show David Dorfman works the crowd, wandering amidst the audience, saying hellos and pressing flesh like the affable mayor of Danceville. The dancers are warming up on a bare stage that has been stripped to the walls to resemble a working studio. Dorfman later says this choice reflects the disproportionate nature of brief performances versus months of rehearsal. It is most appropriate here, where so much of the process is part of the work.

"Lightbulb Theory," a premiere, begins with a solo for Dorfman. He walks across the stage, Michael Wall begins playing the piano and I feel a rush of pride or delight or anticipation. I want to nudge my Vietnamese collaborators with a "yeah dawg, you'll see, we come in all shapes and sizes here." Dorfman can stun any noviate to modern dance. He's the sneaky Average Joe who looks like a linebacker and creates work with overwhelming craft. Of course, this crafty choreographer's greatest gift may be his cultivation of excellent collaborators, primarily dancers. This company could represent a utopian vision of dance-making where dancers are fully creative artists, credited as collaborators and allowed their individuality.

After Dorfman reads a passage referring to fathers and sons, Paul Matteson, Heather McArdle, Jennifer Nugent and Joseph Paulson are revealed first on the backstage balcony performing a post-modern kick line. After then entering through the upstage left door they begin a quartet quietly, as Paulson pounds his fists reflecting an internal stress. A bright dance follows with a series of movement phrases and marching punctuated by the women's giddy squeals and shouts of "Wow." The dancers repeatedly ask us if we've heard the two different theories about light bulbs: Some are said to flicker before they go out and some just go out. The text is returned to several times in impressive solos by each dancer, along with the question of whether it is "better for a life, I mean light, to flicker or just go out" and in the midst of infectious dance I'm pondering grief and loss.

Dorfman's dances can race past you. There are rushes of sweeping movement that flow over you so that in reflection you only remember sparks. It's appropriate, because Nugent is explosive. She sweeps and kicks and drops with ferocious glee. She is powerful, strong and flexible, cute and sexy. She's the dancer I want to be when I grow up. When she's paired with Matteson, the two become a new entity, one creature rabidly devouring the space in a series of thrilling weight shifts.

The evening's second work and premiere, "Impending Joy," has an entirely different tone. Chris Peck's electronic score, also performed live, is a sonic assault. This landscape is painful as compared to the nostalgic feeling evoked by the piano of "Lightbulb Theory." A pile of wire netting and pickets from a fence sits downstage center. The other dancers pile Paulson with pickets and urge him out of the space. He begins a solo full of direct movement, sharp slices and aggressive drops while Matteson, McArdle and Nugent stand in half of the stage washed in red light, designed by Josh Epstein. Paulson throws himself at Matteson even after Matteson has vacated the space. Paulson pathetically drops pickets across the stage. Matteson performs a constricted, distressed solo gesturing to his gut and reaching away while speaking phrases and partial phrases like "You deserve to be" and "You will die."

There is an automated rigor to the dancing that serves as an enjoyable companion to the expansiveness of the first work. As the piece draws to a conclusion, each dancer pulls parts of the fence apart. Nugent is wrapped in the fence; McAdle winds the metal wire around herself and the men struggle with piles of pickets. As Nugent speaks a series of lines beginning with "This is where..." a last light cue of red on the balcony sets a hallucinatory tone and I suddenly glimpse the special little hell that home ownership can offer.

David Dorfman Dance continues at the Duke Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 & 7 p.m. There is no show Friday.


Maura Nguyen Donohue is the artistic director of Maura Nguyen Donohue/In Mixed Company, whose "Enemy/Territory," a collaboration with Hanoi-based choreographer Le Vu Long, continues tonight and Saturday at Dance Theater Workshop. For more information on "Enemy/Territory," please click here.

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