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The Johnston Letter, Volume 1, Number 4
October 2005: A Tale of Two Bells

"I see the bells as a silent scream."

-- Michael Gorra

By Jill Johnston
Copyright 2005 Jill Johnston

Flying to Cologne September 14 for an art event, accompanied by Ingrid, I had an unexpected postwar experience at the foot of Cologne's great Cathedral, its Dom. By "foot" I mean its vicinity, and I was always there. Our hotel was close by, and Museum Ludwig, site of the art event, a pebble's throw away. The whole city really is in its vicinity because the structure looms everywhere, seen from all vantage points, a giant double-spired sentinel more omnipresent than our World Trade Towers were, or Empire State Building is. The Dom is very old, a structure begun in 1248, and everything way below it is new -- or so it seems. In a British RAF "thousand-plane" raid March 30 1942, 90% of the city was firebombed and destroyed. Oh I've been in other German cities where I would look for what's old, and notice the new. Hamburg, in 1943 one of the worst hit, leaving a charred city and 200,000 dead, was one of them. In Osnabruck for a day and a night I saw nothing old at all. I've been to Berlin, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt and Hanover. I'd visited Cologne once before, in 1993. But I never had an Experience, not in Germany anyway. In Britain I had the kind of emotional exculpation I'm talking about, a terrible seismic sadness, in Coventry, the midlands city firebombed the night of November 14 1940 by the Luftwaffe in a raid code-named "Operation Moonlight Sonata." And I had it right on the Cathedral premises, or I should say the ruins. St. Michael's, like the Dom in Cologne a medieval treasure, dated from the 1300s. All that's left of the body of St. Michael's are low decimated walls on three sides, and remains of a polygonal apse with tall arched open-to-the-air windows. Amazingly, its head -- tower and spire, rising 295 feet -- survived. Like the Dom, it's another sentinel, here overlooking an impressive carcass, a cross at opposite end fashioned from scorched beams that fell in the November 1940 carnage; and something brand new -- a shockingly modern cathedral joined by porch and built perpendicularly to the ruins, dedicated in 1962. Such an enormous architecturally necrologic "birth," literally from the side of the ruins, was what undid me. I experienced this in 1976. After Cologne last month, I could draw a straight line between the two cities, the perfect zoom lines you see in airplane magazine maps. At home and as of yesterday I'm adding Lubeck, a moderate-sized city in northern Germany on the Baltic Sea, a place I've never been. Reading and scanning a book someone gave me that had been lying about in my apartment since the end of summer, showing up unaccountably here and there, I found Lubeck in it. If my lines were finer, and maps more accommodating, they would pinpoint my special interest in these cities of the Dom in Cologne, the ruins of St. Michael's in Coventry, and most recently the Marienkirche in Lubeck. All three were damaged, one beyond repair, in a war of unprecedented terror against civilians, including six million singled out for special annihilation as Jewish, and all three have extraordinary bells. The ones in Cologne and Coventry survived, but of Lubeck's pre-war tower bells there are only two, and these are fallen mementos, lying just where they crashed -- in a wrecked but somehow aesthetic configuration, under the south tower in the Marienkirche. They are pictured in a photo on the cover of the book I finally got around to investigating. An American professor of English, Michael Gorra, wrote about his travels in Germany after spending a sabbatical year there. Books by professors are not my normal fare, but the photo, and title, "The Bells in their Silence," could be a curiosity even for those not incurably habituated to these bronze shapes the way I am. For myself though, I've passed up many literary references, always quoted to invoke the romance of bells -- Dante, Longfellow, Byron, Tennyson and Shakespeare among them -- and Gorra's title seemed fairly belletristic. It took my recent trip to Cologne to make the war connection. Gorra's beautiful fallen image from Lubeck, embedded in the richly muted grey-green colors of his jacket
cover, must be the memento of his travels, the symbol of his search for what Germany once was and has become: a replete civilization, a land of rubble and devastation, finally of buried memories. One month after Lubeck in 1942, Cologne became Germany's second city to be firebombed and depopulated by Allied forces. I was there this September to attend the opening of artist George Brecht's retrospective at Museum Ludwig. Brecht, an ex-pat American and old friend, now 79, has lived in Cologne since 1972. Strangely, or not perhaps, he never appeared at his opening (an event marking an exhibition that's a major deal for an artist whose work has been dedicated to showing that life is more important than art), and I replaced him, as I fancy now, with the city's colossal Dom, the tips of whose spires we could see over a lush growth of trees from our hotel windows. The din of its bells had me excitedly opening the windows, leaning way out and shooting pictures. It would be through postcards -- black and white pictures dated 1945 -- that I realized I was staying in a vast war memorial, buried under the rebuilt city, hidden in the Dom by seamless repairs. Here is a postcard showing the skeletons of burnt and roofless buildings from the heights of the Dom. Here is another, of the Dom's high Gothic interior -- its floor a chunky mass of marble and wooden debris. While we were basking briefly on the Rhine one afternoon, I shot a pretty crescent-shaped iron bridge, later finding a postcard picturing the same bridge, the Hohenzollern in 1945, twisted and broken, half submerged in the river, the Dom looming in the background. At home I made a before-and-after photo album, anchored at the end by a postcard image of Cologne's magnificent swinging bell, St. Peter, tuned to a deep C, at 24,000 kilograms Europe's largest, inscribed: "St. Peter is my name of birth,/I protect the German earth;/Sprung of German agony,/I raise my voice for unity."
I presume this "agony" is of that earlier conflagration, the Great War, since St. Peter was cast in 1923. If you have no fear of heights or claustrophobic spiral stone staircases, you could climb 509 steps to see it. Imagine a bell of that magnitude falling like Gorra's two, and from the Dom's dizzying summit, 157.38 meters tall. Left as a memorial, to see its shattered remains you would be peering over the edge of a deep crater. "What altar," Gorra writes of Lubeck's bells, "could compete with this twisted mass of bronze?" He had originally been drawn to the city because of a literary hero, Thomas Mann, born and raised there. Now he was making his last of many visits to Lubeck before returning to the States. And he saw something in the Marienkirche he had never seen before: "... a gleam of silver in the corner of my eye, and I turned to see two stainless steel spikes, put one against the other in the shape of a cross, the NAIL CROSS OF COVENTRY IT'S CALLED, MADE OUT OF METAL FROM THE RUINS OF COVENTRY'S CATHEDRAL: a gesture of reconciliation from the city that Hitler destroyed to the one on which the British took vengeance." (Upper case mine.) So Lubeck was Britain's first catastrophic incendiary strike against Germany -- a year and four months following the demolition of Coventry. After 234 aircraft dropped 144 tons of firebombs and 160 tons of high explosives, at least half of Lubeck was destroyed. The Marienkirche had a gaping hole where its spires had been, and its roof had been blown off. I found a phone number for Gorra and put in a call to him after reading about the "nail cross," wondering if he knew that the altar in Coventry's new cathedral bears the same kind of cross, made of nails salvaged from the same ruins, its own. No he didn't. Then I rushed in where fools might, imagining that bells in general, like those at Coventry or Cologne, alive and swinging, should interest him. However, the last line in his book reads, "Other bells may ring, but these (Lubeck's) will stay silent." He seems clearly to rest his involvement here. In their "silent scream," Gorra finds Germany's culpability ("... the curse that the Nazis laid upon their own house"), and his personal sorrow for the German people. In his moving words and through my discoveries in Cologne, I find my own lament. Ingrid, while traveling through Germany in 1954 with her Danish parents, saw Cologne's ruins from the tower of the Dom, 509 steps up. She quotes her mother as saying, "This is what happens when people don't get along." Is this an understatement, or what? Why, I have asked, did Cologne's Dom, damages withal, remain standing? And why, you might ask, am I so interested in these Christian edifices? I am not and have never been a Christian, and I find the history of Christianity appalling (as what thinking person does not?). The answer to both my questions lies in the bells. I'm not interested in dinner bells or hand-bells or cowbells or bell telephone, only bells in towers, and many of these, such as university towers, are secular. The Dom in Cologne survived because of St. Peter and his nine companions, several of Middle Ages vintage. It may be hard for Americans to understand how important bells are in European countries. Other traditions were imported to America, but not the concept of Europe's consummate and ubiquitous bell population, an indispensable spiritual voice of the people -- independently of religious faith or ideology. As Europe was in flames, many bells were saved by tacit or open agreement between opposing forces. In one such pact, the Allies consented not to bomb the great swinging peal in Cologne Cathedral if the Axis spared Belgium's historic carillon in Mechlin. Many historic carillons in the Netherlands, France and Germany, were thus saved. But many carillons and swinging peals did perish, or were stolen to be melted down for armaments. Over 100,000 bells were deposited in holding areas in Hamburg and other German cities.
Thirty of these ended up in Lubeck's rebuilt tower of the Marienkirche after the war. They had belonged originally to a 36-bell carillon in Gdansk (Danzig), Poland. When Hitler annexed Gdansk in 1939, a key moment in the outbreak of war, he pirated the contents of the city's towers. The story goes that Lubeck received its gift in thanks for hosting many postwar refugees from Gdansk. Now I can extend my zoomy airplane magazine lines to a city in Poland, not a place I could previously even envision on a map. But I return always to Coventry for my signature experience of an event I would never know first-hand, not until September 11 2001 when I saw our Towers in New York come down. And Coventry held a second coming for me. In May of 2002, Ingrid and I were approaching St. Michael's tower and steeple when a huge ruckus filled the air. A band of change-ringers holding ropes to 14 bells was making the most stupendous ear-rending cacophony. I never knew that bells existed here at all. They ring out wildly over St. Michael's ruins and new cathedral body -- a resurrection and the life.


©Jill Johnston 2005; originally published on www.jilljohnston.com. Photos courtesy Jill Johnston. To read more about Jill Johnston, please click here. To read more of Jill Johnston on the Dance Insider, click here.

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