featured photo

Go back to Flash Reviews
Go Home

Flash Review 1, 5-3: A Dream-Upon-Awakening
Cracking Trisha Brown's Code

By Tom Patrick
Copyright 2000 Tom Patrick

SPECIAL: click here for video clip (Quicktime, 544k)

I must confess that it perplexes me in a delicious way to reflect on the smooooth concert I saw last night at the Joyce. Trisha Brown and Company gave us a silky opening night of her thirtieth season. To explain my perplexity: Her [and most others' of the Judson Church branch of the tree] mode is something undeniable that hits me as finely and elusively as a dream-upon-awakening. I concentrate hard to absorb all of it I can, crack the code, but it being so different from my as-yet-earthly milieu I struggle to understand....

(I will insert here that the programs for TBDC's two-week Joyce season are in several configurations. The selections I saw Tuesday may or not be on the ticket you might get.... For instance, on Program B there are extensive selections from "Canto Pianto" (Monteverdi's "Orfeo"), different offerings on some matinees, and a gala/benefit program on the 14th with lots of guest appearances and other goodies.)

Last night's program began simply with the source. Trisha Brown danced the unaccompanied 1978 solo "Water Motor" gracefully, with the fluency and familiarity of the true mother. Not to say dainty! Ms. Brown dives in, and creates a beautiful portrait of kinetic ebb-and-flow. After this wonderful appetizer, a cubistic reprise/flashback followed, in the shape of Jonathan Demme's 1986 film "Accumulation with Talking plus Water Motor" (Fyi, "Accumulation" is the substitute opener on matinee performances of this program.) The film was a treat, in that it's a terrific portrait of Ms. Brown and a wonderful feat by Mr. Demme, as well as providing a tickle of pleasure seeing glimpses of Stephen Petronio et al observing Ms. Brown's dancing and speaking....

Jumping to circa 1987, "Newark (NIWEWEORCE)" for sextet was less whimsical (I felt), but an intriguing sample of compositional interplay, an unfamiliar dialect for me, and it took me a while to adjust to Ms. Brown's arrest and configurations of rhythm. A unison pair (Seth Parker and Keith Thompson) anchor things at first with a long and deft interlude in-synch before others arrive, in shimmering counterpoint to the pair of men. Clad in clay-gray unitards -- by Donald Judd, who also provided "sound concept"(it eluded me) -- the six dancers venture into many juxtapositions of structural balance, taking turns as the legs of the table (my view), and I was absorbed [if not familiarly-satisfied] by this ensemble piece. I particularly enjoyed the later sections' partnering, where anatomy and physiology seemed truly married.

Leading off after intermission was Trisha Brown's 1994 solo "If you couldn't see me," with costume and music by Robert Rauschenberg. Alone in a backless white dress, Ms. Brown dances this entire yummy dance without ever once letting us see her face. Now, is she hiding from us, or just "facing the back" in a clever trick? No. I'd read about this solo when it premiered (thank you, NYTimes) and wanted to see it. I've been a reluctant dancer on some days, and had certainly secretly wished sometimes still to dance but not so frontally exposed. "If you couldn't see me" runs [at least] this through a prism to showcase the expressive powers of other vantage points of a dancer and a dance. And what a back, what a pair of legs has this woman! After a wait of six years, this solo satisfied and intrigued me on many levels, and it was again a treat to see the source herself!

The concert concluded with "Five Part Weather Invention," a new piece that is the second in a specially-commissioned, full-evening jazz trilogy to be premiered [entirely] in June (@ the American Dance Festival, in Durham, NC). Danced by nine to a score by Dave Douglas that was all over the place, the piece left me feeling really in-over-my-head, and hoping the other sections would give me more context for "Five Part Weather..." I was particularly taken with a snaking canonic section, and with a later quintet where unexpectedly someone would periodically fall. The abruptness of these momentary drop-outs was tasty. True to form, Jennifer Tipton's lighting was a soft-spoken co-star here, as well as the revived "Water Machine."

Overall I felt off-kilter, as I've stated, by the rhythm thing, which is so different from my "experience," but that's just me (perhaps I'd be a little more comfortable initiating through TB's "M.O, to Bach"?) At moments I felt I'd had my fill of smooth&organic, yearned for a little more punctuation, maybe, but that's just me too(!?@:*&!!). Regardless of that, a great choreographer and her company in such a diverse and extended run as this is definitely something to get to this fortnight in May. Check soon, 'cause it was a full house tonight....

Happy Anniversary, Trisha Brown!

Go back to Flash Reviews
Go Home