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Flash Review 1, 6-2: Relationships, Shallow and Wise
When a Body Meets a Body at NYCB

By Alicia Mosier
Copyright 2000 Alicia Mosier

When non-balletomanes ask me what makes dance valuable in the modern world or how it could have any relevance anymore, I often say that it's important for us because of its unique ability to teach us about human relationships. We are, after all, beings who live in space and time; we know each other first by meeting a body, and we want to know more the moment that body -- the eyes, the hands, the smile -- responds to ours. These are the simple realities of human interaction about which dance has something to tell us. Last night at New York City Ballet, there were three statements put forward about such matters: Balanchine's "Agon," the premiere of Kevin O'Day's "Swerve Poems," and Jerome Robbins's "I'm Old Fashioned." It was an inspired bit of programming: I learned something about what a shallow relationship looks like by looking at a couple of wise ones.

The O'Day piece showed its youth in more ways than one. It's actually a rather pretty ballet (O'Day was standing behind me at an intermission, telling someone not to worry, it's a very light piece) -- simple blue costumes and bare legs, with Arch Higgins and Albert Evans in ballet-class skirts for some reason; pigtails on some of the women and a shock of short red hair on Stacey Calvert; lovely lighting; and a minimalist set composed of a big black curtain upstage and a smaller white one stage left that kept moving up and down at random. The opening trick is a fun one, featuring a sort of cliff-edge at the back of the stage. Tom Gold starts out the piece as the spastic sprite amidst a company of very swervy kiddos who begin in a big group hug; he's zipping and leaping every which way, and suddenly he slides backwards on his stomach and disappears (audience gasps!) into the floor. He's the life of the party, the fun equivalent of what Peter Martins gave Damian Woetzel to do in "Slonimsky's Earbox." (See Flash Review 2, 5-4: Tears for the Ballet.) Then it's many minutes of woozy tripping from the kids, grouped in twos or fours or sixes -- they really did remind me of the people at the parties I used to go to in high school, where everyone was a smidge tipsy and trying awkwardly to get each other over to their side of the couch.

There was lots of very cool dancing here -- the astonishing Abi Stafford and Carrie Lee Riggins got the moves and the groove especially well -- and lots of steps, lots of moving in and out and popping up and being dropped and carried (plus some rather blatant "echoes" of steps I'd just seen minutes before in "Agon," a lift lifted straight from "Serenade," and a "West Side Story" bit for the marvelous boys). But one question kept coming to mind: What's the reason for these steps? Why this way rather than that? Most of all, what are these people doing together? I couldn't see a mind behind the ballet, couldn't see any logic to the progression of events. Wendy Whelan and Philip Neal looked like the chaperones of this party; Whelan seemed to be aching for more time, more space to move in, for the bustle to quiet down for just a second so she could reflect. I was feeling much the same way. These wispy relationships, this periodical hugging, this randomness dressed up to look like a savvy comment -- enough. This is what the depressing Gen X phenomenon known as the hook-up looks like set to music.

Actually, John King's music (for violins, viola, cello, and bass clarinets) was the star of the show; it reminded me of Philip Glass's harsh, tender string quartets, strangely moving in a way that O'Day's dance never quite came to be. The audience, incidentally, knew it should have been over about seven minutes before it was. Gold reappeared and did his sliding thing again, the crowd started clapping in recognition of a nice full-circle ending, but then there came more slurpy boys and girls, until there was another false conclusion and yet more pretty slurping (this time, God knows why, unacccompanied) before they finally just sort of ran out of steam and stopped dancing. Don't get me wrong: This is a perfectly lovely, if long and increasingly boring, ballet with some truly touching moments (I'm thinking here of Calvert and Evans lying on the floor, she on her side on top of him on his side in a sort of fetal position). But it's a ballet with a teenager's sensibility about human relationships: tender, smart, and beautiful in its way, but lacking a center and a purpose.

"Agon" presented a group of human beings who had somewhat more to say to each other, and somewhat more with which to say it. It was an unusually lively and endearingly imperfect performance. This wasn't the normal cast, and there were definitely some unsure moments, most surprisingly from Damian Woetzel, who's usually so sure of himself it's scary. Here, in the Sarabande, he lacked Peter Boal's expansiveness and picture-perfect poses; instead we got a solo with lots more slinkiness. Jennifer Tinsley and Deanna McBrearty were refreshing in the Gailliard; McBrearty especially was wonderfully flirty, her head peeking out from under her arm from time to time, her little jumps purring and winking. She's a very expressive dancer, without being obvious. It was Kathleen Tracey in the Second Pas de Trois where we usually see Whelan or Maria Kowroski. Tracey looked like she was trying to move with Whelan's force in those potent opening leaps, but it just wasn't working. She couldn't get any propulsion, and the effect was jarring. The men were, well, competent, if a little slow to respond.

Kowroski appeared, all legs and eyelashes, with Jock Soto in the pas de deux. This was a dance between an older man and a young nymphette: she was challenging and teasing him, he was downright intoxicated. There was a great moment where Soto, having grasped the point of Kowroski's shoe, just let go of it suddenly in a gesture that said, "wow, what IS this girl?" Kowroski was enjoying the attention; when she had to reach waaay down to get hold of her ankle so she could lift her leg waaay up behind her, you could tell she was taking her time for the sake of his agitated pleasure. It was the first time in a while that she's been fun to watch. And I saw something new in the final movements: a floor full of deranged court dancers. That's how it should look! All the way through, the dancers looked a bit like people playing dress-up, and in an odd way it worked. These are court dances stripped down, sped up, turned inside out, and gone a little batty in the halls of modernity -- you see the old-time arrangements of courtly manners radicalized, and most of all you see the blood beneath the forms.

If "Agon" shows human relationships at their most extreme -- exposed, anxiety-ridden, trying to keep a hold on things -- then "I'm Old Fashioned" shows us the grace. It's been a long time since I was as moved at the ballet as I was during Whelan and Nikolaj Hubbe's pas de deux last night. Here, at last, were adults encountering each other in the fullness of who they were -- pensive, cautious at times, a little goofy, totally in love. What made it so moving was that she, this whole woman, was responding to him, this whole man, and vice versa; because we could see them thinking, their gestures had depth and purpose, and their smiles when they looked at each other were all the more welcome and authentic. They were ENGAGED; you could see them really meeting each other in the moment. An extraordinary moment it was, too -- I've rarely seen Whelan so deep and alive, as if she was letting us into her secret world. How wonderful it was, at the end of the evening, to be told a story about dignity and respect and graciousness, a story of adults encountering each other, and one that, in its very simplicity, whispered a truth in the ear of the audience, and carried us away. That's ballet with a soul, ballet for OUR souls, and it couldn't be further from the sweet immaturity of Kevin O'Day.

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Alicia Mosier is a New York City-based dancer and writer.

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